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Local

First state mosquitoes test positive for West Nile virus

SPRINGFIELD — The Illinois Department of Public Health has confirmed the first mosquitoes to test positive for West Nile virus in Illinois for 2019.

DuPage County Health Department staff collected the positive mosquitoes on May 21 in Wayne. No human cases of West Nile virus have been reported so far this year.

“The recent rains are leaving many pools of water behind, not only in sewer systems under streets and drainage ditches along roads, but in our own backyards,” said Acting IDPH Director Dr. Ngozi Ezike.

“As we start to see higher temperatures, we will start to see more West Nile virus activity. While we see West Nile virus in Illinois every year, it is important not to become complacent. It’s easy to take precautions to protect yourself by wearing insect repellent and getting rid of standing water around your home.”

Monitoring for West Nile virus in Illinois includes laboratory tests for mosquito batches, dead crows, blue jays, robins and other perching birds, as well as testing sick horses and humans with West Nile virus-like symptoms. People who see a sick or dying crow, blue jay, robin or other perching bird should contact their local health department, which will determine if the bird will be picked up for testing.

West Nile virus is transmitted through the bite of a Culex pipiens mosquito, commonly called a house mosquito, that has picked up the virus by feeding on an infected bird. Common symptoms include fever, nausea, headache and muscle aches. Symptoms may last from a few days to a few weeks. However, four out of five people infected with West Nile virus will not show any symptoms. In rare cases, severe illness including meningitis, encephalitis, or even death, can occur. People older than 60 and individuals with weakened immune systems are at higher risk for severe illness from West Nile virus.

The first mosquitoes to test positive for West Nile virus in 2018 were collected on May 25, 2018 in Cook County. Last year, 74 counties in Illinois reported a West Nile virus positive mosquito batch, bird and/or human case. IDPH reported 176 human cases (although human cases are underreported), including 17 deaths.

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